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Centenary Events

The Salzburg Festival Centenary · State Exhibition

Great World Theatre

Salzburg Museum – Neue Residenz / 1st floor,
26 July 2020 to 31 October 2021


A new state exhibition to mark the centenary of the Salzburg Festival will turn the museum into a stage. For six months, the Neue Residenz will offer a forum to discover the rich history of the Salzburg Festival and its artists. We will bring our archive to life and present visitors with artistic interventions, acted-out stories, film screenings and much more — you are warmly invited to the Festival stage in the Salzburg Museum.

“The State Exhibition is the first event celebrating the 100-year anniversary of the Salzburg Festival. We are grateful to all those who have enabled this: the State and City of Salzburg for their financial support, the Salzburg Museum as our ideal partner – above all, we thank Martin Hochleitner, who is acting as curator, as is our own dramaturge Margarethe Lasinger. Together they have developed a concept which is as imaginative as it is thorough. We are optimistic that this show will offer both the citizens of Salzburg and guests from all over the world fascinating retrospectives and glimpses of the future,” says Festival President Helga Rabl-Stadler.

Artistic Interventions on Festival Theatres Never Built

The Dream of a Fairytale Temple

Mönchsberg, Schlosspark Hellbrunn, Kapuzinerberg, Mirabellgarten
August to December 2020

Numerous plans for a festival theatre were mooted over the last 130 years and went unrealized. For the centenary of the Salzburg Festival, it is possible to see and experience four of these unbuilt architectural projects: on the Mönchsberg, in the park of Schloss Hellbrunn, on the Kapuzinerberg and in the Mirabell Gardens. The projects document how the festival theatres would have made their mark on the city or its surrounding countryside.

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22 August 2020

100 YEARS OF JEDERMANN

The first performance of Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s Jedermann, directed by Max Reinhardt on Salzburg’s Cathedral Square on 22 August 1920, is considered the moment in which the Salzburg Festival was born. 100 years later, this special birthday is celebrated with readings all over town by the Jedermann performers Klaus Maria Brandauer, Peter Simonischek, Tobias Moretti, Cornelius Obonya and Philipp Hochmair, the gala performance of Jedermann on Cathedral Square, a Jedermann streaming event on Kapitelplatz, a literary speech by Elisabeth Orth, who takes us back in time to the era of the Festival’s founding, and a screening of Max Reinhardt’s famous film A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Felsenreitschule.

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A Dialogue with the Visual Arts

The Centenary Poster Series of the Salzburg Festival

A poster series commemorating the Salzburg Festival’s centenary can be viewed since Friday and through the end of August on the Makartsteg bridge in Salzburg. Five international artists with a close connection to the Salzburg Festival have designed one poster each, exploring the founding idea of the Festival. “To awaken the ear, the eyes, human thought and intelligence,” this quote by the composer Luigi Nono could be called an imaginary inscription on the posters. The Spanish sculptor and artist Jaume Plensa, the German painter and sculptor Anselm Kiefer, the American stage director, playwright, painter, lighting designer, stage designer, video artist and architect Robert Wilson, the South African artist William Kentridge and the Austrian artist Eva Schlegel have each designed one poster.

The Salzburg Festival has always had a strong connection with the visual arts. This dialogue between the dramatic and the visual arts was continuously intensified from the 1950s onwards. Suffice it to mention Die Zauberflöte of 1955, to which Oskar Kokoschka contributed the set designs. Fritz Wotruba designed the sets for Oedipus in 1965. Jean Tinguely and Jean-Paul Chambas also designed major productions for the Salzburg Festival. Under the artistic leadership of Gerard Mortier, this dialogue with the visual arts grew even more intense, including Achim Freyer, Jörg Immendorff and Bob Wilson – and it continues to contribute to the dialogue of the arts to this day: Daniel Richter, Jonathan Meese, Rebecca Horn, Alfred Hrdlicka, Shirin Neshat and William Kentridge are only a few of the luminaries involved. Therefore, the idea of inviting outstanding artists to design posters for the Festival’s centenary suggested itself.

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